Aug 22, 2010

Paper Power Technology.



Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed a new energy storage device that easily could be mistaken for a simple sheet of black paper. The nanoengineered battery is lightweight, ultra thin, completely flexible, and geared toward meeting the trickiest design and energy requirements of tomorrow’s gadgets, implantable medical equipment, and transportation vehicles. Along with its ability to function in temperatures up to 300 degrees Fahrenheit and down to 100 below zero,
the device is completely integrated and can be printed like paper. The device is also unique in that it can function as both a high-energy battery and a high-power supercapacitor, which are generally separate components in most electrical systems.




 

Its semblance to paper is no accident— more than 90 percent of the device is made up of cellulose, the same plant cells used in newsprint, loose leaf, lunch bags, and nearly every other type of paper. Rensselaer researchers infused this paper with aligned carbon nanotubes, which give the device its black color. The nanotubes act as electrodes and allow the storage devices to conduct electricity. The device can be rolled, twisted, folded, or cut into any number of shapes with no loss of mechanical integrity or efficiency. Another key feature is its capability to use human blood or sweat to help power the battery. Now, vampires and athletes have just the right option for more flexible power in their homes and coffins!
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...